Quantcast Advantages of Collecting Plants from the Wild

 
  
 
Appendix B: Bioengineering for Streambank Erosion Control -- Guidelines
collecting, transporting, and storing each species. Caution should be exercised in collecting
plants from harvesting areas so that the plant community is not extirpated, left functional, and
the ecosystem not damaged. This can be done by not harvesting in one spot, but dispersing
the harvest areas. Care should be taken by harvesting only fairly common plants. Certainly,
rare plants should be avoided.
Advantages of Collecting Plants from the Wild
a.
Plants are likely to be ecotypically adapted to the local environment.
b.
Plants can often be collected at a low cost.
c.
Plants can be collected as needed and will not require extended storage.
d.
Availability of species is very flexible and can be adjusted as the need arises.
e.
No special expertise is required to grow the plants.
f.
A very wide diversity of plants is available.
Disadvantages of Collecting Plants from the Wild
a.
Weedy species may contaminate the source area and be inadvertantly transplanted.
b.
A suitable area must be found, and more than one donor area may need to be
located.
c.
Plants may not be in an appropriate condition for planting. For instance, they may
be highly stressed, diseased, or insect infested.
d.
Species must be accurately identified or rare plants or weeds may be harvested by
mistake.
e.
Cost of collection and logistics may be very high.
f.
Outdoor hazards such as snakes, adverse weather, noxious plants, e.g., poison ivy
and stinging nettles, parasites, and other inhibiting items may interfere with
collection efforts.
g.
It is often necessary to procure a permit for collecting from native plant sources and
wetlands, in particular.
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