Quantcast DEFINING MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES

 
  
 
3.1.1 DEFINING MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES
Once a water quality problem has been identified and appropriate processes assessed, clear
and realistic management objectives must be established. Previously conducted assessments were
probably conducted with a "rough" idea of what water quality improvements (management objectives)
were desired. Items to consider include but are not limited to:
1.
Who are the stakeholders - involved agencies, users, etc.?
2.
What are the roles of the stakeholders?
3.
What are the water uses and are there potential conflicts?
4.
How will objectives be determined?
5.
Others?
Perhaps, in addition to objectives, one or more measurable goals could be established (e.g.,
restoration of a fishery, reduction in algal blooms, increased dissolved oxygen in the tailwater, etc.).
Developing time lines, funding sources, and identifying who can participate are also part of defining
objectives and developing a management plan. Table 3.1.1 provides an example of management topics
such as the program purpose, contract period, and eligibility for conservation programs for watershed
management. Examples of this approach for nonpoint source pollution control are provided as
Appendices 3.1B and 3.1C. Consideration of these items can result in the development of a
management team and plan and provide for an efficient approach to solving the water quality problem.
3.1.2 STAKEHOLDERS AND THEIR ROLES
As previously defined, stakeholders are those individuals, agencies, and water users with a
vested interest in or responsibility for the water resource. Many of these interests and responsibilities
are linked and are often competing and stakeholders are often required to develop a management plan
that "protects" their interests.
3.1.3 FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS
What does it cost and who is going to pay? Determining costs for water quality management
often includes consideration of not only capital expenditures, but services provided as well. These
services are often substantial and can be used to "partner" or cost-share with federal dollars.
Interactions with local, state, and federal agencies is imperative to combine funding sources to
accomplish management techniques. A list of federal agencies, their programs, and funding are
provided in Table 3.1.1.
3.1-2

 


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