Quantcast CHAPTER 5. POST-PROJECT EVALUATION PROCESSES

 
  
 
CHAPTER 5
POST-PROJECT EVALUATION PROCESSES
5.1 ITERATIVE PROCESS OF EVALUATING APPLIED TECHNIQUES
INTRODUCTION
This session will provide an expanded outline that can be adapted to most situations where an
enhancement technique has been implemented. The process of evaluating an applied technique should
focus on 1) the effectiveness and efficiency of the technique at meeting management objectives, 2)
technology transfer of the technique for other applications, and 3) impacts to the ecosystem beyond the
water quality problems specifically addressed by the technique (but hopefully considered in the
determination of the technique to apply). This process is also described in general terms and will be
more fully developed with input from the workshop participants. Workshop participants should receive
enough information to adapt and help develop an appropriate evaluation process for any enhancement
technique applied in their region. Questions suggested by the National Research Council (U.S.) (1992)
for evaluating post-restoration of an aquatic ecosystem may be adapted and used in evaluating the
application of an enhancement technique. For example:
1.
To what extent were management objectives achieved?
2.
Is the system perceived to be or quantitatively better than before?
3.
What are the maintenance requirements or is the system self-sustaining?
4.
What lessons have been learned?
5.
Have the techniques and information gained been transferred effectively to others?
6.
What was the time and cost?
7.
Were benefits identified, credited, and compared to costs?
8.
Were other approaches more applicable?
Topics to be discussed include monitoring, identification of short and long term trends,
operation and maintenance, and system optimization.
5.1.1 MONITORING
Monitoring should be conducted as part of the assessment process and should provide a basis
for evaluation of post-project conditions if adequate monitoring is conducted upon implementation of
the enhancement technique. Monitoring should be specific for the constituents of interest, well-designed
and implemented, and periodically reviewed for soundness and application of the data for assessments.
Monitoring can be designed to describe both short and long term trends in water quality to determine
the effectiveness of the applied enhancement technique and can also provide information on the
5.1-1

 


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